Celebrated Black Heroes: Assata Shakur

Celebrated Black Heroes: Assata Shakur

Assata Shakur is an African-American activist who was a member of the Black Panther Party and Black Liberation Army between 1971 and 1973. Assata worked through the BPP and the BLA to fight racial, social, and economic oppression, but became the target of U.S. government’s counter-revolutionary COINTELPRO program. This program used a wide range of tactics, including framing, false imprisonments and assassinations of leaders, to disrupt the radical movement.

Rosewood: The last survivor remembers an American tragedy
  • Written by Maria
  • February 5th, 2015
  • About History

Rosewood: The last survivor remembers an American tragedy

Last month marks the anniversary of one the most tragic events in black history — the Rosewood massacre — the result of rape accusations made by a white woman against a black man, which led to violent riots and the murder of several innocent African-Americans in January of 1923. To commemorate this event, historian Dr. Marvin Dunn interviews the last survivor of Rosewood and sheds new light on the event that still haunts African-Americans.

Black Scholar: Dr. Anthony Martin

Black Scholar: Dr. Anthony Martin

Dr. Anthony Martin (1942 – 2013) was a Trinidadian-born professor of Africana Studies at Wellesley College, Massachusetts. He was a lecturer and prolific author of scholarly articles about black history and was considered the world’s foremost authority on Jamaican black nationalist leader Marcus Garvey. Martin authored, compiled or edited 14 books, his earliest work being “Race First: The Ideological and Organizational Struggles of Marcus Garvey and the Universal Negro Improvement Association” (1976).

Black Scholar: Dr. George G.M. James

Black Scholar: Dr. George G.M. James

Dr. George Granville Monah James (unknown – 1954) was a well-regarded historian and author from Georgetown, Guyana. He’s best known for his 1954 book “Stolen Legacy,” in which he presented evidence that Greek philosophy originated in ancient Egypt. He gained his doctorate degree at Columbia University in New York, became a professor of logic and Greek at Livingstone College in Salisbury, N. C., for two years, and then taught at the University of Arkansas, Pine Bluff.

Black Scholar: Dr. Amos Wilson

Black Scholar: Dr. Amos Wilson

Dr. Amos N. Wilson (1941 – 1995) was a social caseworker, psychological counselor, supervising probation officer and training administrator in the New York City Department of Juvenile Justice. He was also an assistant professor of psychology at the City University of New York.

Black Scholar: Dr. Ivan Gladstone Van Sertima

Black Scholar: Dr. Ivan Gladstone Van Sertima

Dr. Ivan Gladstone Van Sertima (1935 – 2009) was a Guyanese-born associate professor of Africana Studies at Rutgers University in New Jersey. He was best known for his work “They Came before Columbus,” which provided a pyramid of evidence to support the idea that ancient Africans were master shipbuilders who sailed from Africa to the Americas thousands of years before Spanish explorer Christopher Columbus, and that the Africans traded with the indigenous people, leaving lasting influences on their cultures. In one example, Van Sertima presents evidence that Emperor Abubakari of Mali used these “almadias” or longboats to make a trip to the Americas during the 1300s.

Black Scholar: Dr. John Henrik Clarke

Black Scholar: Dr. John Henrik Clarke

Dr. John Henrik Clarke (1915 – 1998) was a Pan-Africanist writer, historian, professor, and a pioneer in the establishment of Africana studies in professional institutions in academia starting in the late 1960s. He was professor of African world history and in 1969, he became the founding chairman of the Department of Black and Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter College of the City University of New York. He also was the Carter G. Woodson Distinguished Visiting Professor of African History at Cornell University’s Africana Studies and Research Center.

Black Scholar: Dr. Marimba Ani

Black Scholar: Dr. Marimba Ani

Dr. Marimba Ani is an anthropologist and African Studies scholar best known for her book “Yurugu,” a comprehensive critique of European thought and culture. She completed her Bachelor of Arts degree at the University of Chicago, and holds masters and doctorate degrees in anthropology from the Graduate Faculty of the New School University.

BLACK HISTORY FACT: Elizabeth Key Grinstead
  • Written by Maria
  • February 1st, 2015
  • About History

BLACK HISTORY FACT: Elizabeth Key Grinstead

Elizabeth Key Grinstead -A mixed-race slave living in 17th-century Virginia, Key sued for her freedom using a complex legal argument — and won. In 1655, after the death of her master, Key argued that she and her infant son should be classified not as slaves but as an indentured servant with a freeborn child. Though some have criticized Key for underplaying her blackness, hers is one of the earliest freedom suits in the English colonies filed by a person of African ancestry.

BLACK HISTORY FACT: Robert Morris
  • Written by Maria
  • February 1st, 2015
  • About History

BLACK HISTORY FACT: Robert Morris

Robert Morris (June 8, 1823 – December 12, 1882) was one of the first African-American attorneys in the United States, and was called “the first really successful colored lawyer in America.” Admitted to the Massachusetts bar in 1847, Morris may have been the first black male lawyer to file a lawsuit in the U.S. He was also the first black lawyer to win a lawsuit.

BLACK HISTORY FACT: Prime Minister, Patrice Lumumba

BLACK HISTORY FACT: Prime Minister, Patrice Lumumba

In December 2013, while most people were celebrating “peace on earth, good will toward men,” the U.S. State Department admitted that President Eisenhower authorized the murder of Congo’s first democratically-elected Prime Minister, Patrice Lumumba. CIA Chief, Allan Dulles, allocated $100,000 to accomplish the act. Lumumba’s murder has been called the most important assassination of an African in the 20th Century. How do U.S. citizens make up for this to the Congolese people and to Lumumba’s family?

BLACK HISTORY FACT: Samuel Lee Kountz
  • Written by Maria
  • January 23rd, 2015
  • About History

BLACK HISTORY FACT: Samuel Lee Kountz

Samuel Lee Kountz an African American doctor and kidney specialist was born on this date in 1930. In 1959, Dr. Kountz participated in the first West Coast kidney transplant. Prior to the development of Dr. Samuel Lee Kountz’s technique of detecting and treating rejection of transplanted kidneys, less than five per cent of the transplant patients survived for more than two years. While in London on a surgery fellowship, Dr. Kountz discovered that committed cells of the host attacked and destroyed the small blood vessels of the transplanted kidney. The technique that he and his associates at Stanford Medical School developed permits doctors to watch the fall of the kidney blood supply following surgery and to administer specific amounts of drugs to the patient at carefully timed intervals to overcome the rejection process. In 1964, he received the outstanding Investigator Award from the American College of Cardiology. ‪

My first Black-Matters blog post
  • Written by Maria
  • December 28th, 2014
  • About Heroines

My first Black-Matters blog post

So far, at least 5 natural heroines have died of ’apparent suicide’ or heart attack. I don’t buy it. Especially since they each have been successfully inspiring people to climb out of slave mentality. A very real condition that many don’t even know that they are suffering from until they stop suffering from it.

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