Rosewood: The last survivor remembers an American tragedy
  • Written by Maria
  • February 5th, 2015
  • About History

Rosewood: The last survivor remembers an American tragedy

Last month marks the anniversary of one the most tragic events in black history — the Rosewood massacre — the result of rape accusations made by a white woman against a black man, which led to violent riots and the murder of several innocent African-Americans in January of 1923. To commemorate this event, historian Dr. Marvin Dunn interviews the last survivor of Rosewood and sheds new light on the event that still haunts African-Americans.

BLACK HISTORY FACT: Elizabeth Key Grinstead
  • Written by Maria
  • February 1st, 2015
  • About History

BLACK HISTORY FACT: Elizabeth Key Grinstead

Elizabeth Key Grinstead -A mixed-race slave living in 17th-century Virginia, Key sued for her freedom using a complex legal argument — and won. In 1655, after the death of her master, Key argued that she and her infant son should be classified not as slaves but as an indentured servant with a freeborn child. Though some have criticized Key for underplaying her blackness, hers is one of the earliest freedom suits in the English colonies filed by a person of African ancestry.

BLACK HISTORY FACT: Robert Morris
  • Written by Maria
  • February 1st, 2015
  • About History

BLACK HISTORY FACT: Robert Morris

Robert Morris (June 8, 1823 – December 12, 1882) was one of the first African-American attorneys in the United States, and was called “the first really successful colored lawyer in America.” Admitted to the Massachusetts bar in 1847, Morris may have been the first black male lawyer to file a lawsuit in the U.S. He was also the first black lawyer to win a lawsuit.

BLACK HISTORY FACT: Samuel Lee Kountz
  • Written by Maria
  • January 23rd, 2015
  • About History

BLACK HISTORY FACT: Samuel Lee Kountz

Samuel Lee Kountz an African American doctor and kidney specialist was born on this date in 1930. In 1959, Dr. Kountz participated in the first West Coast kidney transplant. Prior to the development of Dr. Samuel Lee Kountz’s technique of detecting and treating rejection of transplanted kidneys, less than five per cent of the transplant patients survived for more than two years. While in London on a surgery fellowship, Dr. Kountz discovered that committed cells of the host attacked and destroyed the small blood vessels of the transplanted kidney. The technique that he and his associates at Stanford Medical School developed permits doctors to watch the fall of the kidney blood supply following surgery and to administer specific amounts of drugs to the patient at carefully timed intervals to overcome the rejection process. In 1964, he received the outstanding Investigator Award from the American College of Cardiology. ‪

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